You See. We See.

At Crofton House School, we inspire girls to discover and pursue their personal excellence from the first day of junior kindergarten to grade 12 and beyond.

Our teachers are dynamic and engaged professionals, dedicated to making a positive, lasting impact in each girl’s life. Teaching at Crofton House is an opportunity to join a progressive community that is committed to collaborative, student-centred, inquiry-based education.

This is a place where educators and students continually learn and grow.

You see discovery.
We see extraordinary teaching.

Our educators seek and embrace new ideas in teaching and learning, and are supported to put those ideas into practice. Here, the teacher’s voice informs our direction and educational program.

Ideas in Practice

Hear about how our teachers are supported and encouraged to put new ideas into practice every day at Crofton House.

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You see a supportive community.
We see a culture of collaboration.

Our teaching and learning culture begins with collaboration, community and a sense of belonging. Our passionate faculty bring a diversity of strengths and experiences that enrich the learning environment. You will have opportunities to learn from and inspire each other.

A Culture of Collaboration

See how teaching and learning at Crofton House begins with a culture of collaboration.

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You see a spark of inspiration.
We see extraordinary educators.

As our faculty cultivates new ideas in teaching and learning, they are encouraged to share their thoughts and discoveries with our learning community. Explore recent articles written by the school’s thought leaders on our Croftonian Crumbs blog.

How does interdependence build citizenship?
What barriers exist between the learner and the learning?
How does the new BC curriculum embrace student-centred learning?
What value does a pencil have in our technology-rich world?
From the Croftonian Crumbs Blog

How does interdependence build citizenship?

How many times have we heard that children must be independent to establish confidence and enjoy success in life? Educators often consider independence as the culmination of personal development. However, we need to extend the paradigm to a state of interdependence where children begin to realize that they are a connected and significant part of the network of their family, community, and ultimately the world.

— Susan Hutchison, Director, Junior School
From the Croftonian Crumbs Blog

What barriers exist between the learner and the learning?

Of the many complexities facing schools in 2016, the topic of wellness or well-being is one that educators look to governments, clinicians, researchers or outside agencies to provide direction on how to support students through difficult times while not straying beyond what is appropriate within the scope of a school. Laws, standards, practices and guidelines, while useful in defining roles and responsibilities in broad contexts, are not prescriptive and, therefore, when it comes down to case-by-case considerations, it is the teachers and administrator in a school who must interpret these documents and make decisions that weigh what is in the best interests of the student as well as the school community.

— Lois Rowe, Deputy Head & Director, Senior School
From the Croftonian Crumbs Blog

How does the new BC curriculum embrace student-centred learning?

According to Dr. Bruce Bearisto, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Education at Simon Fraser University, the most important innovation the new BC curriculum offers is its focus on personalization. An aspect of student-centred learning, personalized learning strives to address each student’s needs, preferences, strengths, interests, and aspirations as part of a movement designed to promote greater student accountability and engagement in the classroom. Bearisto maintains that student-centred learning will have a profound impact on British Columbia’s schools for years to come.

— Gail Robinson, Department Head, English, Senior School
From the Croftonian Crumbs Blog

What value does a pencil have in our technology-rich world?

As the future takes shape, one cannot ignore the disruptive role of technology, transforming the way we live, learn and interact with others. Access to technology is becoming commonplace in elementary classrooms across the globe. The benefits of this tool are extensive, allowing access to information and tools that enrich and enhance student learning. However, one may wonder about the place of long standing tools such as the pencil? Is there a place for such tools in today’s modernized classroom?

— Wendy Macken, assistant director, Junior School
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